10 accessible plans in Madrid

10 accessible plans in Madrid

It may sound typical, but it's easy to fall in love with Madrid. The Spanish city is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site for its Paseo del Prado and Buen Retiro, where culture and science coexist with nature.

In addition, it is the European capital with more hours of sunshine during the year, which is reflected in the cheerful atmosphere that can be seen in its streets.

If you have not yet traveled to Madrid, take note. In this week’s post we propose 10 accessible plans that you can not miss.

1. Step into a Crystal Palace

The famous Retiro Park is located in the center of the city and occupies an area of 125 hectares. Today it is an important meeting point where you can stroll, play sports, go sightseeing or relax among the beautiful gardens.

One of the most outstanding architectural elements of the park is the Retiro Park Lake, the work of Cristóbal de Aguilera, which was built between 1634 and 1636. There it is common to take a ride in a rowing boat (there are two accessible for wheelchair users) or in an accessible solar boat.

The beautiful Crystal Palace is also one of the most visited places. The building was built in 1887 and is accessible via a ramp. It was originally intended to be a giant greenhouse to store tropical plants for the Philippine Islands Flora Exposition. Today it is one of the best examples of “iron architecture” in Madrid.

2. Be fascinated by the Guernica

The Paseo del Prado and Buen Retiro concentrates a large number of museums. The best known are the Museo Nacional del Prado, the Reina Sofía and the Thyssen-Bornemisza. All of them are accessible.

The Museo Nacional del Prado is the most important cultural institution in the country. It houses paintings by Goya, Velázquez, El Greco, Rubens, Bosch and Titian, among other artists.

The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía is dedicated to 20th century and contemporary art. It hides great works such as Guernica, Portrait de Madame or La bouteille d’anis.

In addition, it is worth visiting the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, which has one of the most important pictorial collections in the world -almost 900 works of art that the Thyssen-Bornemisza family has gathered in seven decades-.

3. Enjoy one of the most stunning viewpoints

The Cibeles Palace is one of the most iconic buildings in the city. In fact, since 2007 it is the headquarters of the City Hall.


We recommend you to go up to the viewpoint and enjoy the views of historic Madrid. The entrance fee is reduced for people with disabilities. In addition, the building has an elevator for users with reduced mobility, free wheelchair rental and adapted toilets. You can check opening hours, buy tickets online and see more information at CentroCentro.

4. Feel like royalty

The Royal Palace of Madrid has more than 135,000 square meters and is open to the public. In different parts of the residence you will find accessible ramps, so if you are a wheelchair user you can make the visit without inconvenience. You will also find a stair lift in the General Palace Archive and adapted toilets.

You can consult all the information on accessibility in the publication of the National Heritage, the Royal Board on Disability and the ACS Foundation (available only in Spanish).

5. Stop at kilometer 0 of Spain

Whether from the television or at Puerta del Sol itself, Spaniards start each year looking at the clock of the Real Casa de Correos while eating grapes. Visiting this square is essential to understand the history of Madrid.
As a souvenir of their visit, many decide to take a picture next to the plaque that marks the kilometer zero of Spain. In addition, in this square also highlights the advertising poster of Tio Pepe and the emblematic sculptures of the Bear and the Strawberry Tree and the equestrian statue of Carlos III.

6. Explore the Plaza Mayor

Endowed with charm, the Plaza Mayor is located in the old part of the city. The unmistakable equestrian statue of Felipe III presides over this beautiful pedestrianized place.
In the square you will see the Casa de la Panadería with its baroque façade. You will also see numerous restaurants and bars that usually attract a lot of tourists.

7. Taste delicious tapas at the San Miguel Market

The San Miguel Market is one of the best known in the capital. It has 100 years of history and has numerous stalls where you can buy fresh seafood or the best Iberian ham.

If you feel like trying Spanish tapas, here you will taste quality food. The building has an access ramp and an adapted bathroom.

8. Enter the Almudena Cathedral

The Cathedral of Santa María la Real de la Almudena is the most important religious building in the city. Pope St. John Paul II consecrated it in 1993 after its 100 years of construction.
Wheelchair users can access through a ramp at the entrance on Bailén street.

9. Go shopping on Gran Vía

The construction of Madrid’s Gran Vía took decades, but it made the center and northwest of the city better connected. Today it is one of the most important streets and has a variety of restaurants and stores.
In this street you will find the Metrópolis, Telefónica and Carrión buildings. Also, as a curiosity, here you can see the largest Primark in Spain.

10. Attend an opera at the Teatro Real

The Royal Theater of Madrid is located in front of the Palacio de Oriente. It is considered a Spanish historical monument, so we encourage you to enjoy an opera or a flamenco show inside.
The theater has adapted seats on all floors. The Felipe V door has an access ramp, while the Carlos III door is at ground level. In addition, the building has elevators and platform lifts.

Tell us, what other plans would you like to do in Madrid? We have many more ideas, so if you want a continuation of the post, leave us a comment.

Sources: Madrid – Official Tourism Website, CentroCentro, Patrimonio Nacional, Spain is Accessible, Catedral de la Almudena, Teatro Real

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It may sound typical, but it’s easy to fall in love with Madrid. The Spanish city is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site for its Paseo del Prado and Buen Retiro, where culture and science coexist with nature.

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