Getting around Venice: accessible transportation

Getting around Venice: accessible transportation

Over the past few years, Venice has worked to remove barriers in its historic center and make its public transportation more accessible to all. However, this beautiful city has hundreds of bridges and uneven floors to avoid.

In this week’s post we tell you all the details about its transportation, so you can get around in the most comfortable way possible and make your next trip unforgettable.

You should know that the famous gondolas of Venice are not accessible. In the past, these winding elongated boats were the main transportation in the city. However, they now serve a more touristy purpose. Many travelers enjoy a romantic tour in the company of the gondolier, a professional who continues the legacy of a millenary tradition and reveals the fascinating secrets of this place full of canals.
The traghetti are another type of gondola that crosses the Grand Canal. They are also not recommended for people with physical disabilities.

On the other hand, if you are looking for a practical way to get around the city or to visit other nearby islands, the vaporetti are the best option. These water “buses” are accessible to people with reduced mobility.
The best-known vaporetto line is number 1, which runs along the Grand Canal and makes many stops at major tourist attractions such as the iconic St. Mark’s Square. During the day, boats usually run every 10 to 20 minutes on the main lines. Night service is also available.
More information on vaporetto schedules and fares can be found on the ACTV website (information available in English and Italian). It is also possible to purchase tickets through the official tourist site of the City of Venice or at the ticket offices of Venezia Unica. Discounts are available for wheelchair passengers and free access is provided for accompanying persons.
All the piers belonging to the company responsible for public transport (ACTV) are accessible. It is true that in case of high tide, wheelchair users may be inconvenienced by the excessive slope of the ramps.

Accessible buses

As for land transport, 80% of public buses have a platform and spaces for wheelchairs. These vehicles can take you to Mestre, Venice Marco Polo Airport or Treviso Canova Airport.

To easily identify these buses, look for the “BUS FACILE” logo at the bus stop.

Accessible water taxis

Water taxis are a faster way to get around and avoid queues. They are more expensive, so it is advisable to hire them when traveling in a group.
Most are not accessible. However, there are a few exceptions that replace the steps with a platform lift for passengers with wheelchairs. To book them in advance, call Consorzio Motoscafi Venezia directly.

Mobility equipment

If during your trip you are looking for mobility equipment or orthopedic centers, you may be interested in this list we have found on the city’s official website:

If you have ever traveled to Venice, share with us your tips. If you haven’t been, tell us: would you like to?

For more information about the sights of the city, we remind you that you can get our Venice Accessibity City Guide.

Sources: Venecia.es, Vivo Venetia, Venezia Unica, Città di Venezia

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